to celebrate or not to celebrate – that is the question

Some thoughts on Cinco de Mayo…

howdoyousaytacoinspanish

courtesy of evfxonline.com courtesy of evfxonline.com

I went to Dublin, Ireland in the summer of 2008. I had such a wonderful time there and met many great friends that I returned to Dublin in the summer of 2009. At this point, I know what you’re thinking – “um, hello Rose, wrong blog! This is the one about Mexico!” But bear with me for a second, my trip to Ireland does tie in with Mexico, this blog and Cinco de Mayo.

courtesy of wallupload.com courtesy of wallupload.com

While I was in Dublin, I discovered something interesting about St. Patrick’s Day. The Irish in the Republic of Ireland do not celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in the same manner or with the same intensity we do in the United States. Now granted, St. Patrick’s Day is celebtrated in Ireland on March 17th. It has been an official holiday since 1903. Since it is an official holiday or a…

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I’m back…

starbucks

Yes…yes..it’s true.! I was in Playa del Carmen last week 🙂 I have some photos and wonderful stories to share, I promise. It’s just been a tumultuous week for me personally.

So I will just start today with my welcome drink at my favorite Starbucks in Playa.! And leave the rest of the stories to come out over the next several posts…

Dos Equis cinco redux

courtesy of dosequis.com

courtesy of dosequis.com

Feliz lunes a todos.!! Happy Monday everyone.!! This weekend has been super involved…and a little overwhelming. So forgive me my very short blog post. I hope everyone’s weekend was way way better than mine. And I hope everyone’s week is super fantastic.! I will explain more later…

Since I need a little bit of fun in my life….I’ve resurrected The Most Interesting Man in the World today. And not just with one commercial…but with two.!! The first one is from 2010 and I aired it on my blog last year for Cinco de Mayo. The second commercial is a new one from 2015.! Enjoy.! Y salud.!!

find your beach take 11

courtesy of corona.com

courtesy of corona.com

Feliz Cinco de Mayo.!!! Happy May 5th.!!! Ok…I know it’s really May 6th.!! But I’ve been super busy.!!! For one, I was in Playa del Carmen last week.!! Yay.!! But, it was bittersweet. For the sweet part – I had so much fun and I saw great friends!! It was awesome to reconnect 🙂 On the bitter part – so much has changed and I’m not sure how I feel about it. I promise to dissect my visit over the next several posts (pictures included).!! Secondly, I came back home to a bunch of work…so just a little occupied.! Plus I posted an historical bit on Cinco de Mayo yesterday…so I had to post a fun post today.!!

This week’s Corona commercial does just that.! It celebrates Cinco de Mayo and continues our theme of ‘find your beach’. Even after several years, the beach in Playa still makes me smile 🙂 There’s something to be said for relaxing in that clear, clear, blue water of the Caribbean while the puffy clouds float above your head in the azure sky. It’s enough to put you in a blissful head space.! Enjoy.! Y salud.!!

Why we celebrate Cinco de Mayo

As I have already described Cinco de Mayo in previous years’ blog posts – I thought today we would take a look at the holiday from another blogger. Please enjoy WQAD.com’s holiday explanation.! Salud.!!

WQAD.com

(CNN) — Guacamole and fajitas. Mexican flags and mariachi bands. Margaritas, beer — and more beer. (Sometimes with lime, thanks to that clever marketing campaign.)

It’s May 5, and America is celebrating Cinco de Mayo — but why?

The Mexican holiday is still celebrated in Mexico, but the local tributes pale next to the giant celebration in the United States, complete with restaurant specials, high-volume advertising and endless promotion. Here are five things you should know about May 5.

1. It’s not Mexican Independence Day.

Cinco de Mayo celebrates the Mexican victory over France (of all countries) at the Battle of Puebla, May 5, 1862.

Mexico had been invaded by Spain, France and Great Britain in late 1861, but within six months Spain and Britain had pulled out. With the U.S. Civil War raging north of the Mexican border, the French decided to take advantage of the chaos and invade…

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Dos Equis cinco (de mayo)

courtesy of dosequis.com

courtesy of dosequis.com

Happy Cinco de Mayo.!! Feliz Cinco de Mayo.!! I hope everyone had a great weekend and enjoyed the company of their family and friends.!! As you know today is Cinco de Mayo.! As I have mentioned before in this blog, this holiday commemorates the Mexican army’s victory over the French during the “Batalla de Puebla” or Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War in 1862. Outside of the city of Puebla, very few festivities are held for this celebration in other Mexican cities. However, it’s a whole other story when you get to the United States.

In the U.S., Cinco de Mayo is the holiday Americans celebrate anything and everything Mexican. It is very similar to the way St. Patrick’s Day is used to celebrate everything and anything Irish in the states. However, in Ireland, St. Patrick’s Day is a day like any other. Therefore, when in Rome…or Chicago. I hope everyone enjoys their Cinco de Mayo celebrations.!! Don’t forget to indulge in some margaritas, tequilas, and cervezas..!! To get the festivities goings, let’s see how Dos Equis’ Most Interesting Man in the World celebrates Cinco de Mayo.! Enjoy.!! Y salud.!!

to celebrate or not to celebrate – that is the question

courtesy of evfxonline.com

courtesy of evfxonline.com

I went to Dublin, Ireland in the summer of 2008. I had such a wonderful time there and met many great friends that I returned to Dublin in the summer of 2009. At this point, I know what you’re thinking – “um, hello Rose, wrong blog! This is the one about Mexico!” But bear with me for a second, my trip to Ireland does tie in with Mexico, this blog and Cinco de Mayo.

courtesy of wallupload.com

courtesy of wallupload.com

While I was in Dublin, I discovered something interesting about St. Patrick’s Day. The Irish in the Republic of Ireland do not celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in the same manner or with the same intensity we do in the United States. Now granted, St. Patrick’s Day is celebtrated in Ireland on March 17th. It has been an official holiday since 1903. Since it is an official holiday or a bank holiday, most businesses and schools are closed and transportation runs on a reduced schedule.

But in the United States, specifically in cities such as Chicago, Boston and New York where there is a large diaspora – it is THE Irish Celebration..!! Rivers are dyed green – please note Chicago River photo below. Parades are held – two in Chicago in fact – one on the north side and one on the south side. And let us not forget all the green beer and drunken revelry that abounds during this most Irish of holidays. Except not so much in Ireland… Just in the states…

Green Chicago River

Green Chicago River

This Irish/U.S. conundrum brings me to Mexico and Cinco de Mayo. Cinco de Mayo is a celebration held on May 5th, hence the name here in the states. However, in Mexico, it is only celebrated regionally, primarily in the state of Puebla. In Puebla, the holiday is called El Día de la Batalla de Puebla or The Day of the Battle of Puebla. The date commemorates the Mexican army’s unlikely victory over the French in 1862. Also, in Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is not a national holiday. It is only an observance.

Mexico’s actual Independence Day is celebrated on September 16th and is considered a national holiday. El Grito or The Cry is the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico. It is celebrated in every city center in Mexico with the ringing of the church bells. However, in the United States, Cinco de Mayo is celebrated as THE Mexican holiday showcasing Mexican pride and heritage. While no rivers are dyed or parades held, there is definitely much Mexican food and beer consumed in it’s honor.

courtesy of latinbayarea.com

courtesy of latinbayarea.com

I find this a little strange. Maybe I’m the only one. It is not that I am against celebrations, parades or beer. I love all of that..!! But why would Irish immigrants come to the United States and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day of all the holidays they could celebrate? Why would Mexican immigrants come to the United States and celebrate Cinco de Mayo as a sign of Mexican pride rather than El Grito? Is it one of those melting pot submersions that occur? You throw in a little Irish and a pinch of Mexican and serve it up in America and you get St. Patrick’s Day and Cinco de Mayo..!!

Maybe… But it does make me wonder what would happen if Americans moved in huge numbers to other countries. Instead of celebrating the 4th of July as a source of American pride – would we find ourselves celebrating Groundhog Day or President’s Day as our patriotic identity..?? Hmmm… just a little something to think about. But in the meantime, cheers..!! And salud..!!

courtesy of theberry.com

courtesy of theberry.com