Tecate take 46

Yesterday was St. Patrick’s Day.!! And all over the world where the Irish diaspora reside, there were celebrations.! Here in Chicago and yes even in Mexico.! Please enjoy a little history about the Irish-Mexico connection and a Tecate commercial.!!!

howdoyousaytacoinspanish

courtesy of ebay.com courtesy of ebay.com

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.!! I saved Tecate especially for today because it is the official holiday and my unpacking has finally reached an end.! How delightful.! I need a celebratory beer now more than ever. And what better day than today in Chicago where everyone is Irish for the day 🙂 A city where we dye our river green to commemorate this awesome holiday.!

Green Chicago River Green Chicago River

Strangely enough, the Irish also have an impressive history with Mexico. The Mexican-American War of 1846-48 was fought due to the U.S. annexation of Texas which Mexico strongly disputed (see wikipedia.com). A group of immigrants and expatriates (mainly of Irish, German, French, Italian, and other European nationalities) defected from the American side during the war.

courtesy of lavozcolorado.com courtesy of lavozcolorado.com

There are several theories as to why the men deserted, but the main one posits their shared cultural and religious heritage with…

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Tecate take 46

courtesy of ebay.com

courtesy of ebay.com

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.!! I saved Tecate especially for today because it is the official holiday and my unpacking has finally reached an end.! How delightful.! I need a celebratory beer now more than ever. And what better day than today in Chicago where everyone is Irish for the day 🙂 A city where we dye our river green to commemorate this awesome holiday.!

Green Chicago River

Green Chicago River

Strangely enough, the Irish also have an impressive history with Mexico. The Mexican-American War of 1846-48 was fought due to the U.S. annexation of Texas which Mexico strongly disputed (see wikipedia.com). A group of immigrants and expatriates (mainly of Irish, German, French, Italian, and other European nationalities) defected from the American side during the war.

courtesy of lavozcolorado.com

courtesy of lavozcolorado.com

There are several theories as to why the men deserted, but the main one posits their shared cultural and religious heritage with Mexico. The Mexican army/government also offered them citizenship, land grants, and more money. The deserters formed the St. Patrick’s Battalion or El Batallón de San Patricio and fought with the Mexican Army against the U.S. Even today, they are honored as heroes in Mexico on September 12th and March 17th.!

courtesy of yucatan-holidays.com

courtesy of yucatan-holidays.com

Today’s Tecate commercial honors St. Patrick’s Day, the Irish in Chicago, and the Irish in Mexico. It is called “¿quien dijo que los hombres?” or “Who said that men?” I thought it was a good commercial for today because it’s all about celebrations which St. Patrick’s day is about here in Chicago. However, the commercial goes a step further by asking the age old questions about men – Who said that men don’t have feelings? Who said that men don’t sing? Who said that men don’t dance? And finally, who said that men don’t love and do great feats for love? Apparently, not Tecate men.!! Enjoy.! Y salud.!!

to celebrate or not to celebrate – that is the question

courtesy of evfxonline.com

courtesy of evfxonline.com

I went to Dublin, Ireland in the summer of 2008. I had such a wonderful time there and met many great friends that I returned to Dublin in the summer of 2009. At this point, I know what you’re thinking – “um, hello Rose, wrong blog! This is the one about Mexico!” But bear with me for a second, my trip to Ireland does tie in with Mexico, this blog and Cinco de Mayo.

courtesy of wallupload.com

courtesy of wallupload.com

While I was in Dublin, I discovered something interesting about St. Patrick’s Day. The Irish in the Republic of Ireland do not celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in the same manner or with the same intensity we do in the United States. Now granted, St. Patrick’s Day is celebtrated in Ireland on March 17th. It has been an official holiday since 1903. Since it is an official holiday or a bank holiday, most businesses and schools are closed and transportation runs on a reduced schedule.

But in the United States, specifically in cities such as Chicago, Boston and New York where there is a large diaspora – it is THE Irish Celebration..!! Rivers are dyed green – please note Chicago River photo below. Parades are held – two in Chicago in fact – one on the north side and one on the south side. And let us not forget all the green beer and drunken revelry that abounds during this most Irish of holidays. Except not so much in Ireland… Just in the states…

Green Chicago River

Green Chicago River

This Irish/U.S. conundrum brings me to Mexico and Cinco de Mayo. Cinco de Mayo is a celebration held on May 5th, hence the name here in the states. However, in Mexico, it is only celebrated regionally, primarily in the state of Puebla. In Puebla, the holiday is called El Día de la Batalla de Puebla or The Day of the Battle of Puebla. The date commemorates the Mexican army’s unlikely victory over the French in 1862. Also, in Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is not a national holiday. It is only an observance.

Mexico’s actual Independence Day is celebrated on September 16th and is considered a national holiday. El Grito or The Cry is the most important national patriotic holiday in Mexico. It is celebrated in every city center in Mexico with the ringing of the church bells. However, in the United States, Cinco de Mayo is celebrated as THE Mexican holiday showcasing Mexican pride and heritage. While no rivers are dyed or parades held, there is definitely much Mexican food and beer consumed in it’s honor.

courtesy of latinbayarea.com

courtesy of latinbayarea.com

I find this a little strange. Maybe I’m the only one. It is not that I am against celebrations, parades or beer. I love all of that..!! But why would Irish immigrants come to the United States and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day of all the holidays they could celebrate? Why would Mexican immigrants come to the United States and celebrate Cinco de Mayo as a sign of Mexican pride rather than El Grito? Is it one of those melting pot submersions that occur? You throw in a little Irish and a pinch of Mexican and serve it up in America and you get St. Patrick’s Day and Cinco de Mayo..!!

Maybe… But it does make me wonder what would happen if Americans moved in huge numbers to other countries. Instead of celebrating the 4th of July as a source of American pride – would we find ourselves celebrating Groundhog Day or President’s Day as our patriotic identity..?? Hmmm… just a little something to think about. But in the meantime, cheers..!! And salud..!!

courtesy of theberry.com

courtesy of theberry.com